Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers are responsible for joining or repairing metal parts or products. As part of their job duties, they study blueprints, inspect materials and structures to be welded, and oversee the welding processes.

Read this article to find out about their pay, job prospects, and training requirements.

Career Statistics for Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers

The employment data displayed in the table below is taken from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.

2018 Median Salary $41,380 per year
Job Outlook, 2018-28 3%
Number of Jobs, 2018 424,700
Employment Change, 2018-28 14,500

Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics

Career Outlook and Prospects of Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers

Forecasts suggest that the employment opportunities for Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers will increase by 3% from 2018 to 2028.

The nation’s aging infrastructure will require the expertise of qualified and competent professionals in this field, who will help rebuild buildings, highways, and bridges. The construction of new power generation facilities may also create more employment opportunities in this field.

It is easier for welders to move between different industries because their skills are transferrable. The basic skills and principles of welding are similar across different industries, For instance, a welding professional who has been laid off in the oil and gas industry may be able to find a job in the manufacturing industry.

The job prospects generally depend upon the welder’s skill level. However career prospects are bright for those welders who are willing to relocate and are trained in the latest technologies.

State Data for Welders,Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers

The following bar chart shows the five states with the highest employment figures for Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers in the US.

Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics

The statistics show Texas had the highest number of Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers working. The 50,120 people employed in Texas in this particular occupation were more than three times higher than the fifth state on the list, Wisconsin that had 15,550 Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers.